2017/2018
6 episodes
4:33

Coda’s mini-documentary series tells the stories of Russians who have been prosecuted or imprisoned for their posts, shares or likes on social media.

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Episodes

1
Jailed for a Like | Episode One: Pokemon Games

In Episode One Coda speaks with Elena Chingina, the mother of 22-year-old Ruslan Sokolovsky who is currently waiting for his trail date in pre-trial detention in a Yekaterinburg prison. On August 11, 2016 Ruslan uploaded a video of himself playing Pokemon Go in a church. Shortly afterwards, he was arrested at home and charged with offending the religious feelings of believers. His trial began in mid-January.

2
Jailed for a Like | Episode Two: When Caring Becomes a Crime

This is a story of young mother from Russia's Kurgan region who was sentenced to six months in prison for sharing a video on the Russian social media platform Vkontake. The case of Evgeniya Chudnovets has sparked debate across Russia about how Russians should behave on social media.

3
Jailed for a Like | Episode Three: Silencing the Poet

This is a story of Alexandr Byvshev, a poet and a schoolteacher from Russia’s Oryol region who was sentenced to 300 hours of labor for posting a poem about Ukraine that criticized Russia’s annexation of Crimea. In January, a second new criminal case was started against Byvshev for another poem about Ukraine.

4
Jailed for a Like | Episode Four: A Family Accused of Extremism

This is the story of an electrical engineer from the city of Tver who has been in jail for two years for his social media posts and of his family ruined by the Kremlin's clampdown on dissent. Jailed for a Like tracks cases of Russians who have been prosecuted or imprisoned for their posts, shares or likes on social media.

5
Jailed for a Like | Episode Five: Criticism or Terrorism?

This is the story of Aleksey Kungurov, a blogger from the city of Tyumen sentenced to two years in prison for his post which criticized Russia’s bombing campaign in Syria.

6
Jailed for a Like | Episode Six: The Lucky One Percent

This is the story of Natalia Vahonina, a journalist from the city of Nizhny Tagil who says that Russia’s laws on extremism on social media were used to try and silence her investigation into local corruption.

Credits
  • PRODUCED BY
    Сoda Team
  • EDITED BY
    Coda Team
  • CAMERA
    Coda Team
  • GRAPHICS
    Coda Team
CODA ORIGINAL Series

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